Becoming Professional: A Blog

Posts Tagged ‘linkedin


number of my connectionsAfter my talk on how to use social media profiles professionally for Huntswood’s People Learning and Development Associate Evening, I was asked plenty of questions. This was great, and I enjoyed answering them. They were usually practical, and most of them I was able to answer on the spot. But there was one that I couldn’t: How do disconnect from a LinkedIn Connection.

The first thing that flashed through my mind was, “Why would you want to? Does it hurt to have a connection?” But I quickly realized that, yes, actually, it sometimes can. The particular gentleman asking the question no longer wanted to be associated with someone. I, personally, was connected to someone who I have long considered more spammer than useful Connection, but just hadn’t bothered to disconnect from. There are plenty of reasons to disconnect from someone on LinkedIn. It’s a social network, and like all social networks, it’s based on relationships. And sometimes relationships just don’t work out.

While I still believe that it is not good to burn bridges, I can still believe that sometimes you just have to separate from someone. Like a spammer or someone who has “poisoned the well.” So, if you are connected to someone like that, here’s how you can disconnect on LinkedIn.

Step 1: Go to your Connections page

LinkedIn Disconnect first screen shotLook in the upper right-hand corner, tucked away from all the normal things you look at. Click there.

Step 2: Choose the offending Connections

LinkedIn Disconnect Second screen shotUsing the check boxes, select all individuals you no longer wish to connect with and then click the blue “Remove Connections” button.

I think it is important to note that unlike when you first become Connections and you receive a wonderful e-mail congratulating you on your new link, the person you’re disconnecting from will not receive notice that you’ve disconnected from them. This is common to most, if not all, social networks. For example, Twitter sends you an e-mail when your followership goes up, but not when it goes down. So your risk of being found out and cornered for an explanation is lowered. It could still happen, however, if the person you disconnected from notices that he or she can’t see your updates anymore, but at least the risk is lowered.

Also note that if you should wish to Connect to this person again, it will be easier. I believe you wont have to be accepted again. The Connection will just reappear.

Step 3: Make sure it went through

LinkedIn Disconnect final screen shotI think it is important to make sure that it worked. So look out for this screen. If you don’t see it, it is possible that LinkedIn is buggy.

So there you have it. Disconnecting is really easy. Again, I recommend using this with due thought, but if the relationship isn’t working, get out of it. That’s what my mother told me about boys, and that’s what I tell all my gal pals. I don’t see why this isn’t true for all relationships.

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me and Paul Wycherley

Me and Olympian Paul Wycherley, another speaker

This past week, I spoke at the Huntswood People Learning and Development event about how to use social media professionally. My audience was made up of contractors in the learning and development field, trainers who work with financial services providers. For the most part, though they may have been on LinkedIn, they were not using social media professionally to aid them in their work. That’s where I came in. My job was to introduce them to the benefits of social media. In less than 20 minutes. I obviously couldn’t discuss everything, so I limited my discussion to profiles. And even then I still went over.

The thing is, profiles are not easy, particularly for those who are not avid social media users. After all, even those who do frequently use social media often get limited use out of their social media profiles. There is a lot more to a LinkedIn profile than merely saying your name and work history. Even Twitter can have some potential, even if you do not use the service regularly. As for Facebook, well, I suggested creating a Facebook Page. It’s just too tempting to post a picture from Friday night on Facebook, both for you and your friends. And those privacy settings are confusing. A Facebook Page just makes more sense here.

As far as first speaking gigs go, I think I did pretty well. I was the first guest speaker, and after me was the canapés, also known as dinner, drinks, and mingling. I was flooded with questions and personal stories. Everyone seemed ready to get started and redo their own online profiles, or put them up in the first place. That’s all a speaker can really ask for, isn’t it?

Here is the full presentation. A video should be on its way shortly from Huntswood, so expect that as well.


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Who Am I?

I am a Digital Native who is trying to puzzle out what exactly that means. I share my thoughts on social media, digital business models, and PR here on this blog.

I am currently getting my Masters in Digital Marketing from Hult International Business School, having gotten my B.S. in Marketing from Arizona State University. Everything is on track and I am making headway towards my dream: World Domination... or being a productive, helpful citizen and marketer. Whichever comes first.

Don't hesitate to get in touch. I Tweet daily at @KateDavids and also have a science fiction and fantasy blog (maskedgeek.wordpress.com) and Twitter (@Masked_Geek).

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